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In this Issue
Fall 2013

Keep Current on Required Training

Child And Adult Care Center Reimbursement Rates

Learn about Legumes

CACFP Mandatory Administrative Training

Medical Statement for Children with Special Dietary Needs

New Child Nutrition Staff

Put Our State on Your Plate’ with local foods

Cycle Menus Must be Pre-approved

Attention on Whole Grains

 

Keep Current on Required Training

According to ND Code, the Lead Food Service Worker (LFSW) is required to attend a 10-hour Sanitation and Safety class within six months of being hired for that position. The LFSW must then complete a three-hour Sanitation Update training every five years thereafter.  Each individual completing the Pathways trainings for Sanitation and Safety or Sanitation Update will receive a certificate of training. We recommend that a copy of this certificate be placed in the individual’s personnel file.

The Fall Pathways Course Listing is now on the Child Nutrition & Food Distribution web site http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/child/ under the New & Hot and the Training tabs. The registration form is included with the course listing. No mailings will be made of this listing. Authorized representatives and lead food service workers (LFSW) should make sure the information on the course listing is made available to all food service workers.

The Child Nutrition office keeps records of the trainings in a Pathways database. The database is updated annually with the names of the LFSW used in NDFoods. The person listed as the LFSW in NDFoods should be the “head cook” for the site. Since an email address is not a required field in NDFoods, the correct head cook should be identified regardless if they have an e-mail address or not. Name changes of food service personnel due to marriage, divorce or other legal proceedings should be reported to our office so the Pathways database can be updated.

There are a few other courses that can be taken instead of the Pathways version. Approved sanitation trainings can be found on the Child Nutrition & Food Distribution web site under the Training tab and clicking on the Sanitation Training Requirements link. If sanitation training other than Pathways is taken, a copy of the certificate verifying training was completed must be sent to the Child Nutrition office (either by mail or fax to 328-9566) so credit for the training can be added to the Pathways database.

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Child And Adult Care Center Reimbursement Rates

July 1, 2013 – June 30, 2014

 

Full

 Reduced-Price

Free

Breakfast

$.28

$1.28

$1.58

Lunch/Supper

$.28

$2.53

$2.93

Snacks

$.07

$0.40

$0.80

 

 

 

 

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Learn about Legumes

Legumes are beans and peas which including kidney beans, pinto beans, black beans, black-eyed peas, garbanzo beans (chickpeas), split peas, and lentils. They can be purchased in several forms including dry, canned, or frozen. Legumes are a great source of plant protein and are also excellent sources of fiber and several nutrients including potassium and folate. Note: Green peas, green lima beans, and green beans are not considered legumes because of their different nutritional makeup.

Legumes can count toward a vegetable serving or as a meat alternate, but not both in the same meal. Including legumes on your menu can be done in several ways:

  • Serve black beans or refried beans with tacos.
  • Have chili for lunch.
  • Make a casserole with beans as one of the ingredients.
  • Try this recipe for Roasted Garbanzo beans and serve it as part of a snack along with milk or crackers.

Roasted Garbanzo Beans (large recipe):

Roasted Garbanzo Beans (small recipe):

Yield:  84 (2 Tbsp.) servings

Yield: 26 (2 Tbsp.) servings

1 #10 (110 oz.) can of garbanzo beans

2 (15-16 oz each) cans of garbanzo beans

2 Tbsp. canola oil

2 tsp. canola oil

¾ tsp. garlic powder

¼ tsp. garlic powder

¾ tsp. onion powder

¼ tsp. onion powder

¾ tsp. seasoned salt

¼ tsp. seasoned salt

1 oz. dry ranch mix

0.25 oz dry ranch mix

2 Tbsp. canola oil

2 tsp. canola oil

Drain garbanzo beans and rinse well. Preheat oven to 325oF. Spread beans out evenly on a baking sheet and dry in oven for 30-35 minutes stirring every 10-15 minutes; beans should be slightly starting to brown. Remove beans from oven and pour into a mixing bowl. Increase oven temperature to 400oF. Toss beans in the bowl with 2 tsp. of canola oil. Return beans to baking sheet and bake an additional 1 ¼ hours stirring every 15-20 minutes. Bake until beans are hard and crunchy to the bite. Return beans to mixing bowl and toss beans with seasonings and the additional 2 tsp. of canola oil. Spread beans out onto a baking sheet and cool completely. Store in an airtight container.
Crediting: 2 Tbsp= 1 oz M/MA or 1/8 c. vegetable

To learn more about legumes visit: www.choosemyplate.gov/food-groups/vegetables-beans-peas.html

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CACFP Mandatory Administrative Training

The mandatory CACFP administrative training will be held on Tuesday, October 1, 2013 in Bismarck from 1 – 5pm, or in Fargo on Tuesday, October 8, 2012 from 1-5pm.  Registration will be available on our website under New and Hot. 

Who should attend? The Authorized Representative (individual responsible for the overall child care food program) and the Record keeper (individual responsible for completing the paperwork and submitting the monthly reimbursement claim) must attend.

Renewal Time

CACFP application renewal time is here! The application renewal packet is mailed to the agency’s authorized representative in August. Changes to the process are outlined in the cover letter and checklist. It is important to read the cover letter and checklist before completing the renewal forms. The renewal forms must be completed and returned to DPI by September 16, 2013.  DPI will approve the paper application prior to approving your on-line application.  Complete applications must be submitted and approved before submitting a claim for fiscal year 2014.

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Medical Statement for Children with Special Dietary Needs

Each special dietary request must be supported by a statement, which explains the food substitution that is requested. It must be signed by a recognized medical authority and must include:

  • Identification of the medical or other special dietary condition which restricts the child’s diet
  • Food (s) to be omitted from the child’s diet
  • Food (s) to be substituted

Click on http://www.dpi.state.nd.us/child/sfsp/tools/med-statement-CACFP.pdf  to view form.

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New Child Nutrition Staff

Lynell Thueson
Hello everyone!  My name is Lynell Thueson.  I have lived in Bismarck for over 15 years.  I began working in the Child Nutrition and Food Distribution Unit this past June. Some hobbies that I enjoy are reading different kinds of books (mystery, western, comedy), riding horse, riding bike, watching football on Sunday’s, painting ceramics, and spending time with family.  I collect miniature spoons and miniature cups with saucers from all different states.  My favorite color is purple and I love chocolate.

My husband Timothy and I have been married for 35 years. He loves antiques. We have one son, Mark, who lives in Bismarck and works for Clear Channel Radio as production director, program director, digital media director, and “on-air” talent.

I am currently working towards my Bachelor’s degree in Business Management.  This has always been a personal goal of mine since obtaining my Associates Degree in Business Management. I am very excited to be a part of the Child Nutrition and Food Distribution Unit, DPI team!

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Put Our State on Your Plate’ with local foods

Farm-to-school programs offer many opportunities to educate students about good food and nutrition through farm to school programs. It can be as simple as participating in the Apple Crunch event on Food Day Oct. 24, or celebrating “locally grown” every month with ND Harvest of the Month.

Other possibilities include North Dakota Farm to School Week will be celebrated Sept. 16 through Sept. 21st and National Farm to School Month is October. These annual events feature locally grown fresh fruits and vegetables for lunch.  ND Farm to School offers good food as well as lessons about agriculture, gardening and healthy eating.

Some new free materials to assist you with implementing Farm to School in your child care can be found at www.ndfarmtoschool.org. The resources tab has many web sites with recipes and lessons. The Harvest of the Month tab has posters for 15 North Dakota vegetables, recipes and information about each vegetable or fruit.

These materials can be downloaded and used for free. There are a limited number of beautifully printed posters and recipe books available. Please contact Sue Balcom at sbalcom@farrms.org for more information about receiving some printed materials for your child care.

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Cycle Menus Must be Pre-approved

** Remember: All cycle menus utilized by your center must be pre-approved by DPI prior to implementation. This includes any significant changes to cycle menus that have already been approved.   

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Attention on Whole Grains

Whole grains have been getting a lot of attention lately. What are whole grains and what is some key information to know about whole grains?

Whole grains are unrefined, which means the nutrient-packed parts of the grain have not been removed. The whole grains have more fiber than refined grains as well as several vitamins and minerals. Examples of whole grain foods include whole wheat pasta, whole wheat bread, brown rice, oatmeal, whole grain corn chips, and whole cornmeal.

Here are some ideas for putting whole grains on your menu.

  • Use brown rice instead of white rice; even instant brown rice is quick, easy, and healthy!
  • Substitute whole wheat pasta in casserole recipes instead of white pasta.
  • Make sandwiches from whole wheat bread or whole wheat buns instead of white bread or white buns.
  • Layer deli meat and cheese in a whole grain tortilla for a fun and easy to eat wrap.
  • Include whole grain crackers as part of your snack.
  • Serve whole grain cereals at breakfast whether it is a cold cereal or a hot cereal like oatmeal.
  • When baking, substitute whole wheat flour for half of the all-purpose flour.

Be aware -  to watch out for ways manufacturers package their products to make you think their food is a whole grain even though it may not be. If the package says “Made with Whole Grain” or “Wheat Bread”, it is likely not a whole grain. Here’s how to know if a grain product is a whole grain:

  • “whole grain” is listed first on the ingredient list (with the exception of water)
  • product carries the FDA whole grain health claim
  • contains at least 8 grams of whole grain per serving (as shown on the stamp)

To learn more about whole grains visit www.choosemyplate.gov/food-groups/grains.html.

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North Dakota Department of Public Instruction
Kirsten Baesler, State Superintendent
600 E. Boulevard Avenue, Dept. 201
Bismarck, North Dakota 58505-0440
701/328-2260

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