Skip to content
nd.gov - The Official Portal for North Dakota State Government
North Dakota: Legendary. Follow the trail of legends
Go to the Department of Public Instruction Home Page
About DPI Kirsten Baesler's Homepage DPI Contact Information DPI Employment opportunities DPI News DPI Forms Search the DPI website

 Roundup Logo
 

In this Issue
Winter 2014

Updating your License information in NDFoods

Owner/Administrative Changes at Centers

Have You Hired a New Lead Foodservice Worker? Has a Cook’s Name Changed?

Crediting Handbook for CACFP now available online!

Lactose Intolerance- What is it?

Centers/Sponsors with More Than One Site
 Self-Monitoring

New Food Allergy Resource

Nutrition and Physical Activity Best Practices

Team Nutrition Offers New Education Resources

Vary Your Veggies: Red/Orange Vegetable

Spring 2014 Training

Meet Stephanie Miller

 

 

Updating your License information in NDFoods

Our office has changed the procedures for when Centers receive their renewed/updated licenses. It is the responsibility of the Center to edit the license information within NDFoods once you receive the copy of the new license. The steps to update are:  Log onto NDFoods; click-Sponsor Profile and then click on the Sites tab; pick the site; pick the program (Child and Adult Care (CACFP); Edit check the license number and license capacity (to make sure they match what is on the license), and update the license expiration date; save. Remember to fax/email or mail a copy of the new license to the Child Nutrition Office.

Back to top

Owner/Administrative Changes at Centers

CACFP programs must notify the Child Nutrition office of any changes in the ownership or administration (i.e. director) of the centers prior to when these changes are made. Failure to notify our office of these changes could delay or reimbursement payments or make the center ineligible for payments. Please contact Carla Wardzinski or Stacie Morowski if there will be a change in ownership/administration. 

Back to top

Have You Hired a New Lead Foodservice Worker? Has a Cook’s Name Changed?

Whenever a new Lead Foodservice Worker (LFSW) is hired:

  • The authorized representative is required to update the new name on the site application in the FNP system.
  • Once the change is input and our office approves the change, we will determine if the new LFSW (the head cook/person preparing the meals, not the authorized rep) requires sanitation training.
  • If training is required, a letter with training dates and locations will be sent to the authorized representative and the new LFSW.
  • The state does not require a LFSW to have a physical or receive immunizations.
  • The LFSW at each site must have Sanitation and Safety training within six months of being hired/placed in the LFSW position.
  • The LFSW may take ServSafe or Serving It Safe training at the child care center at his/her own expense instead of the free Pathways sanitation instruction.
  • If the sanitation requirement is met through either ServSafe or Serving It Safe, the LFSW must send a copy of the certificate to our office to document that the training has been completed.
  • Once the ten-hour Sanitation and Safety training requirement is met, the LFSW must attend a three-hour Sanitation Update training every five years thereafter.

Our office will send a letter to both the authorized representative and the LFSW when training is required.

If the LFSW’s name is changed (because of marriage or divorce, etc.), please update the NDFOODs system and send an email to Tara Koster.  In the email, let Tara know the former name and the new name so she knows the information is merely a name change and not a new person to add to the Pathways database. Contact Tara toll free at 1-888-338-3663 or directly at 701-328-3210.

Back to top

Crediting Handbook for CACFP now available online!

USDA has just released a new Crediting Guide for CACFP that is written under the current CACFP meal patterns. This resource complements the Food Buying Guide for Child Nutrition Programs by providing crediting information on foods that are commonly served in child and adult care centers, family day care homes, and at-risk afterschool care centers.  It also incorporates and updates the crediting information in previous publications What’s in a Meal? and Crediting Foods in the Child and Adult Care Food Program. This handbook is currently accessible through the USDA Website

Back to top

Lactose Intolerance- What is it?

How is food intolerance different from a food allergy?  What are the symptoms of food intolerance?  What foods should be avoided?  How can I manage food intolerance in my child care?  Find the answers to these questions and more in the November 2013 edition of Meal Time Memos for Child Care Providers

Back to top

Centers/Sponsors with More Than One Site
 Self-Monitoring

Reminder:  Sponsors of multiple CACFP sites are required to complete a monitoring visit at each of their sites three times each year.

Some of the monitoring requirements include:

  1. At least two of the reviews must be unannounced.
  2. Use the monitoring form below
  3. At least one of the unannounced reviews must include a meal observation.
  4. Reviews must be no more than six months apart.
  5. A five-day reconciliation (meal counts for five days) must be completed. This process compares the number of meals served on the day of the visit to the number served during the same meal service on the previous five days.
  6. A follow-up review must be completed whenever a problem is noted and corrective action is required.
  7. At least one review must be conducted during the first four weeks of operation for each new site.

Back to top

New Food Allergy Resource

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has released voluntary guidelines for managing food allergies in schools and early childhood education programs. This resource contains valuable information for the daily management for food allergies and the recommended actions and responsibilities for staff members.

Back to top

Nutrition and Physical Activity Best Practices

The North Dakota Department of Human Services recently released two documents outlining the best practices for nutrition and physical activity in child care settings. These best practices serve as a guide and a measurement tool for encouraging and teaching healthy lifestyles.

The “Best Practices for Nutrition in a Child Care Settingpdfdocument lists recommendations to assist child care providers in making healthy choices when developing menus including great information about preparation and safety.

The “Best Practices for Physical Activity in Child Carepdfdocument explains recommendations for screen time, ways for creating play environments and supporting physical activity, and much more.

Together we can promote nutrition and physical activity to become a regular part of a child’s day beginning now and lasting into the future.

Back to top

Team Nutrition Offers New Education Resources

Team Nutrition has new nutrition education resources available to help introduce preschoolers to fruits and vegetables, and also to provide nutrition and wellness tips for young children.

  • Grow It, Try It, Like It! Preschool Fun with Fruit and Vegetablesis a garden-themed nutrition education kit for child care staff that introduces children to: three fruits – peaches, strawberries, and cantaloupe, and three vegetables – spinach, sweet potatoes, and crookneck squash. The kit included seven booklets with fun activities, a CD-ROM with Supplemental Information, and a DVD with Cool Puppy Pup’s Picnic and Lunch Parties.
  • The Nutrition & Wellness Tips for Young Children handbook is specifically for CACFP providers caring for children ages 2 to 5 years of age. It includes a series of tip sheets, supplements, best practice success stories, and a list of resources that will help providers address nutrition and wellness goals for planned activities and meals served through CACFP.

Also add color to your menus while encouraging healthy choices by using free clipart images from Team Nutrition.

Back to top

Vary Your Veggies: Red/Orange Vegetable

Red/orange vegetables are one of the five vegetable subgroups. Examples of red/orange vegetables include carrots, pumpkin, red peppers, squash (acorn, butternut, and Hubbard) sweet potatoes, tomatoes, tomato paste, and tomato sauce. Please note that vegetables in baked goods such as breads or cakes cannot be credited as a vegetable. Try to incorporate at least one serving of red/orange vegetables in your menus each week. Here is a fun idea for serving red/orange vegetables and a recipe for Orange Glaze Carrots:

Veggie Smiley Face: We know that children love finger-foods! The red/orange vegetable subgroup offers many great finger food options including carrot sticks, carrot coins, tomato wedges, and red pepper strips. Arrange these finger-food veggies on a platter to make an eye-appealing smiley face using carrot coins for the eyes, tomato wedges for the nose, and red pepper strips for the mouth and eye brows. Be sure to show this veggie creation to the kids and allow them to choose which veggies they want.

Orange Glazed Carrots   Yield: 25 (1/3 c. = No. 12 scoop) servings
                                               1/3 c. cup serving provides ¼ c. vegetable and fruit

1 Tbsp. cornstarch

½ c. water, cold

2 qt. frozen sliced carrots

¼ c. margarine or butter

¼ c. + 2 Tbsp. brown sugar, packed

¼ c. + 2 ½ Tbsp. frozen orange juice concentrate

½ tsp. ground nutmeg (optional)

½ tsp. ground cinnamon

½ c. raisins (optional)

  1. Combine cornstarch with cold water until dissolved and set aside for step 3.
  2. Place carrots into a 9”x13” pan.
  3. To make the glaze combine the following in a saucepan: margarine, brown sugar, orange juice concentrate, nutmeg (optional), cinnamon, and dissolved cornstarch. Stir to blend.
  4. Bring to a boil. Remove from heat. Add raisins (optional).
  5. Pour glaze over the pan of carrots.
  6. Bake at 375oF for 20-30 minutes.

Recipe source

Back to top

Spring 2014 Training

Classroom Sanitation and Safety and on-line Sanitation Update classes are being offered this Spring. The information can be found at

Back to top

Meet Stephanie Miller

Hi, my name is Stephanie Miller- I am child nutrition specialist and a licensed registered dietitian. Although I am considered new the Child Nutrition and Food Distribution staff, my time with DPI actually began in May 2012 when I became part of the team as a temporary child nutrition specialist to help with the transition to the new meal pattern for schools. Then in October 2013 I was hired as a part-time child nutrition specialist. I work remotely in the south central/south eastern portion of North Dakota conducting monitoring reviews, and providing training and technical assistance to schools and childcare programs. I also create and design training documents and program materials for the food programs.

My husband Craig and I live on the Miller family farm near Ellendale where we raise cow/calf pairs and organic crops. I am excited to be a part of the Child Nutrition and Food Distribution staff and look forward to meeting many of you as I am out and about traveling the state!

 

 

 

a division of the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction
horizonal rule

Home    |    Programs & Services    |    Resources    |    Grants    |    State Standards    |    Education Legislation

Administrative Rules    |    Links    |    Frequently Asked Questions    |    Site Map   

This site is best viewed with Internet Explorer 7.0 or higher

Get FireFox    Get Google Chrome   Get Microsoft Internet Explorer     Get Adobe Acrobat Reader

Visit the Adobe website for PDF accessibility tools.

Send mail to dpi@nd.gov if you have any questions or comments.

North Dakota Department of Public Instruction
Kirsten Baesler, State Superintendent
600 E. Boulevard Avenue, Dept. 201
Bismarck, North Dakota 58505-0440
701/328-2260

Disclaimer Statement